Imaging Indigene, Han Taiwanese, and Royalty in Collection: A NPM, NTM, and NMTH Joint Exhibition
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Imaging Indigene, Han Taiwanese, and Royalty in Collection: A NPM, NTM, and NMTH Joint Exhibition

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Imaging Indigene, Han Taiwanese, and Royalty in Collection: A NPM, NTM, and NMTH Joint Exhibition

Event Details

The National Palace Museum (NPM) is world renowned for its extensive, one-of-a-kind collection of Chinese imperial and official court items. The National Taiwan Museum (NTM) is home to a wide-ranging and diverse collection of Taiwan indigenous artifacts. The National Museum of Taiwan History (NMTH) maintains the nation’s most comprehensive collection of items reflecting Taiwan’s historical heritage and folk culture. Together, these three museums hold the iconic treasures that respectively reflect three protagonists of Taiwan history - Taiwan’s indigenous people, Han Taiwanese, and the Chinese imperial court and officials.

This exhibition, centered on the unique, respective characteristics of Taiwan’s indigenous people, Han Taiwanese, and the Chinese imperial court and officials, was jointly developed and curated by the three participating museums. The exhibition’s ten themed sections have been designed to both highlight the unique nature of each museum’s collection and kindle visitor curiosity and interest. Each section is carefully curated, with researchers from each museum selecting relevant items from their respective collections of indigenous, Han, and official court items that together present a comprehensive and engaging narrative.


The ten theme sections in this exhibition include: 1) The Non-monetary Power of Coins; 2) A Cryptic Written Language; 3) Hooked on Smoking Paraphernalia; 4) The Beautiful Art of the Banquet; 5) The Captured Imaginings of Outsiders; 6) Remembering Our Ancestors; 7) The Art of Feminine Adornment; 8) The Blessings of Prodigious Progeny; 9) The World of Sex & Passion; and 10) Stylish Men & Warriors. Each museum selected relevant collection items for inclusion in each theme section, making this exhibition a synthesis of thirty distinct curatorial units.


Considered individually, each of the thirty curatorial units work as standalone contributions from their respective museums. However, when considered as a whole, they invite visitors to consider, compare, and contrast Indigene, Han Taiwanese, and Chinese official court perspectives on each of the ten highlighted themes. This exhibition is designed to remind visitors how three of Taiwan’s key historical influencers - Taiwan’s indigenous cultures, Han Taiwanese settlers, and Chinese imperial officialdom - adopted similar-yet-different ways to relate with, manage, interpret, and communicate common cultural themes and human experiences.